Posted tagged ‘Perinton’

Illuminating Carl W. Peters

August 31, 2016
Carl W. Peters mural, "Fairport", on display at the Fairport Historical Museum.  Photo courtesy of Keith Boas.

Carl W. Peters mural, “Fairport”, on display at the Fairport Historical Museum. Photo courtesy of Keith Boas.

On June 21, 2016, Illuminated History held its fifth annual cemetery tour in which actors portrayed residents of the burying ground.  The tour, which was sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society, took place at the Fairport Historical Museum.  Mount Pleasant Cemetery in the village of Fairport, New York, was the focus of the tour.

Carl W. Peters was a renowned artist.  Born in Rochester, New York, he moved to Fairport as a child.  Carl’s love of art was apparent at an early age, and it was a passion that would last his entire life.  His “Fairport” scene, on permanent exhibit at the Fairport Historical Museum, is just one of many murals that were commissioned to him around the city of Rochester.

In this Illuminated History series, each of the scripts are based on in depth historical research, although some creative license may have been taken.  Carl W. Peters was portrayed by Craig Caplan.

Evening, folks.  I’m not quite sure why I’m here this evening.  My family wasn’t influential like the DeLands or industrious like Mr. Parce.  You see, I’m just an artist.  My name is Carl Peters.

Since I’ve been invited to tell my story, I suppose I should get to it.  I was born in Rochester November 14, 1897, the eldest child of Frederick and Louise Meyers Peters.  We moved to Fairport when I was 11 and bought a place on Jefferson Avenue, at the corner of Sandy Hill. 

After we moved here, my passion for painting went into overdrive as people started to take notice of my work.  I designed some post cards for the Stecher [pronounced STEK’-er] Lithographic Company and also some covers for McClure’s and other magazines.  In 1917, the Fairport Herald printed a story about me winning the best poster contest to advertise the pure food show to be held in Convention Hall, Rochester. 

Carl W. Peters, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

Carl W. Peters, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

That was nice and all, but I didn’t paint for the awards.  I painted because I had a love for it.  Best thing in the world to make a living at a job you love.

The Great War came along just as my career was heating up.  I joined up with the 15th Cavalry and spent a year overseas.  I was fortunate to be assigned to the Camouflage Corps as a designer.  I’d like to think I saved a few lives with my camouflage painting, despite the fact that I wasn’t on the front lines.  It’s pretty ironic, though.  I had always wanted to paint in France.  It just never occurred to me that I would be painting camouflage on military equipment!  By the way, I did get furlough in the fall of 1918 and managed to get some nice sketches done while in Paris.

After the war, I settled in New York City for awhile, and then moved on to Massachusetts in 1925.  Winters were spent painting in the Rochester area, and summers in Massachusetts.  I’d built a new studio at my place in Fairport, and it was exhilarating to be out in the snow looking for bursts of color in an otherwise white landscape.  Most of my paintings have a pop of red in them somewhere.  It just helps bring the paintings to life.

My first marriage didn’t work out, but it gave me two beautiful daughters.  My second marriage, to Blanche Peaslee, lasted over thirty years.  You see, Blanche was also an artist and she understood my need to paint.

Since I’ve been old enough to hold a brush, I’ve painted every day.  I’d still paint if I could hold a paintbrush.  This

Carl W. Peters self-portrait.  On loan to the Fairport Historical Museum by a private collector.

Carl W. Peters self-portrait. On loan to the Fairport Historical Museum by a private collector.

otherworldly stuff just isn’t conducive to that.  I’m most known for my landscapes, though I’ve been known to paint a portrait or two.  Your museum actually has a self-portrait that is on loan from a local art collector.  I feel it’s an accurate representation of my face. 

Speaking of my face, there’s a legend that I painted myself into one of the people in the mural upstairs.  In fact, there’s another legend that I painted my face into each of the people in the mural, even the women!  I’ll let you be the judge of that.  I’m just the artist.

Since we’re in this museum building that used to be the library, let’s talk about that mural upstairs.  It’s something I’m very proud of, the fact that I was chosen to paint that mural through the Works Progress Administration, also known as the WPA.  I wanted it to reflect the history of our community, the farmers and the laborers and everyone who worked hard to make Perinton what it is today.  Throughout the city, more of my murals still exist, though the Fairport mural is close to my heart since it represents my hometown.

I died July 7, 1980 at age 82.  I’ve got a nice spot at Mount Pleasant under a large tree.  Hmm…this would be an interesting landscape to paint.  If only I could hold a paintbrush again!

Script by Vicki Masters Profitt

(c) 2016 Vicki Profitt’s Illuminated History

Illuminating Cyrus Packard and Oliver Loud

October 5, 2015

On June 16, 2015, Illuminated History held its fourth annual cemetery tour in which fifteen actors portrayed eternal residents of three historic Perinton, New York, burying grounds: Egypt Cemetery, Schummers Cemetery and Perinton Center Cemetery.  The tour, which was sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society, took place at the Fairport Historical Museum.

In this Illuminated History series, the scripts are based on in depth historical research, although some creative license may have been taken.

The next people to be highlighted from this tour are Cyrus Packard (1771-1825) and Oliver Loud (1780-1829), who were portrayed by Dave Scheirer and Wes Harris.  This is the first year we had characters interacting with each other, and the response was overwhelmingly positive.

Dave Scheirer as Cyrus Packard and Wes Harris as Oliver Loud

Dave Scheirer as Cyrus Packard and Wes Harris as Oliver Loud

[CYRUS]: When Perinton first became a town, in 1812, I was running a tavern in Egypt. My illustrious establishment was appointed as the location for the first town meeting, held in May 1813. At that meeting, I, Cyrus Packard, was duly elected Perinton’s first Town Supervisor, which seemed fitting to me, as I was one of the most influential and intelligent men in town.

My family has a long history of prominence in this country. I am descended from a Mayflower passenger, Hester Mahieu. My first Packard ancestors to come to America were Samuel Packard and his wife Elizabeth, who sailed on the S.S. Diligent in 1638. They settled in Hingham, Massachusetts, where they ran a tavern. I guess inn-keeping is in my blood.

I was born in Cummington, Massachusetts in 1771. My father, Barnabas, bought land in Macedon in 1791 (for eighteen and a half cents per acre), but after coming out here and viewing it, decided he was too old to clear and farm it. So instead, he sent me west with two of my brothers, Bartimeus and John, and we cleared it and settled it. We traveled by oxen for six weeks during the height of winter, when everything was frozen (and so were we!). But the forests were dense and filled with wolves, bears, and Indians, so travel in winter had several advantages: leaves were off the trees, so we could see the Indians; bears were hibernating; and we could cross the frozen Hudson River on ice. We slept under our sleigh each night for some protection from the elements, but it was a rough trip, I tell you.

I came to Perinton in 1806 to strike out on my own. I bought land on the Pittsford-Palmyra Road, near the Ramsdells, who had been neighbors of mine back in Massachusetts when I was growing up. When I first moved here, Perinton didn’t exist; this land was still part of Boyle. I served as Justice of the Peace, constable, assessor, commissioner of highways, and other important posts for Boyle. I also built a tavern along the Pittsford-Palmyra Road, providing a rest stop for the stagecoach approximately halfway through the journey from Palmyra to Rochester. Mine was the first tavern along the route.

[OLIVER]: Aye, you might have built the first tavern, Cyrus, but that doesn’t mean yours was the best! My tavern, Loud’s Tavern, was bigger and (dare I say) better’n yours! Your high-falutin’ airs don’t mean much; I, Oliver Loud, am also descended from a Mayflower passenger: William Brewster! Every one of us who moved out here walked at that time, facing dangers and hardships along the way. I myself walked to Palmyra in 1803 from Massachusetts, where I married my lovely wife, Charlotte in 1805. We had seven children together.

We moved to Egypt in 1806, the same year as you, Cyrus, so you’ve got nothing on me there! My first home was a log cabin, which I also used as a tavern. That establishment was located at the corner of Loud Road (which was named in my honor, as it ran through my farm). We had no sawmill in Egypt at that time, so I used the lumber from my wagon to make my bar. I reckon it was still a good sight better’n your bar, Cyrus!

I added a store to my tavern, to provide useful items, such as nails and groceries, to the locals, as well as those passing through on the stage. I also recognized the need for a lumber mill, and I built one in 1825, combining the water from three different creeks to power it. That enabled me to build a newer, larger tavern made of lumber. It was a beautiful, two-story place. That, too, included a store, and it also served as a postal drop for the area. My tavern also served as a polling place during elections, and as a courtroom (my father-in-law was the justice of the peace, and held court at night over his pint of ale). Your bar may have been the political center when the town first started, but mine eventually became bigger and more influential than yours.

[CYRUS]: Well, be that as it may, I was always more influential in local politics than you. One thing we had in common, though, was that, as tavern owners, we had to be well-informed about issues of the day, and we subscribed to the newspaper at a time when very few could afford to. We were also a fountain of information, which we used to settle bar bets and disagreements.

I settled in the eastern part of Perinton, because the farmland there was wonderful. In fact, that’s how Egypt got its name. There was a period of time during the early 1800s when the weather was not conducive to farming. During 1809, it rained every day in June, and corn did not grow in most parts of New York. In 1810, there was a heavy frost in July; again, the corn did not grow. And 1816 was known as “the year without a summer,” due to a volcano eruption in the South Pacific that affected weather all over the globe. We had snow in June and July (makes this past winter seem mild, doesn’t it?), and frost every month, and people were faced with famine-like conditions all over the state, but Egypt always had good harvests. Whatever the weather, our corn grew. People flocked here to buy our crops, like in Biblical times, making us prosperous. Egypt thrived; hence our ability to maintain multiple taverns (of varying degrees of comfort and style) in such a small area!

[OLIVER]: We did have some unusual weather during that time. I found it fascinating, and in fact, I became the first weather forecaster in town. I studied astronomy, learning about the tides and weather. I published a weather almanac, called The Western Almanac, throughout the 1820s, until my death in November of 1829. It contained weather forecasts and astronomical data of use to farmers. My forecasts were so accurate that they were eagerly bought by other almanac publishers, as well. The local farmers planted very successfully by my forecasts.
In addition to weather forecasts, my almanac contained information about local roads, mail service, courts, and useful recipes and tips, including a recipe for Perinton Mead, which included egg whites, water, honey, and spices, in addition to yeast. I also included a method for cleaning your casks, so your mead would taste fresh and not spoil.
[CYRUS]: While you were busy publishing mead recipes, I was providing food and lodging for travelers. The stage changed horses here, and there was a blacksmith shop nearby, as well. My first wife, Sally, and I had one child together. Our daughter Lucretia was born in 1789. Sadly, Sally died soon after Lucretia was born. We moved here, and I remarried a woman named Leah, and we had eight children together. But my daughter Lucretia was always special to me, and she began helping me run the tavern at an early age. She was a smart girl. You’ll meet her in a few minutes.

My wife Leah was a God-fearing woman, and she helped found Perinton’s First Congregational Church. After my death in 1825, Leah moved west to Michigan with some of our children, so I am buried in Center Cemetery without her. In fact, the only other family member buried with me is my beloved daughter Lucretia.

[OLIVER]: I outlived you, my friend, and am sad to report you narrowly missed some of the biggest political excitement of our time: the William Morgan anti-Mason incident in 1826. He was from Batavia, and had threatened to publish an exposé of the Masons, and he subsequently disappeared. I am sure those secretive, irreligious Masons were up to no good and murdered him, although it was never proven. But I missed having the chance to discuss those events with you. I am sure we would have had many a heated exchange about it, but we would have come down on the same side in the end. I died four years after you, in 1829, and am buried in Egypt Cemetery.

My second tavern, which was located near where the Town Centre Plaza is today, remained there until the mid-1980s, at which time it was moved to Bushnell’s Basin to escape the developer’s axe. It continued as a bed and breakfast near Richardson’s Canal House for a while, but is now a private residence. If you want to see a glimpse of a tavern from the early 1800s, go to Bushnell’s Basin. But if you want to raise a glass to the memory of me and my friend (and rival) Cyrus Packard, well…make sure you do so in a reputable establishment!

Script by Suzanne Lee

(c) 2015 Suzanne Lee Personal Histories

 

Illuminating Deva Ellsworth

June 22, 2015

On June 16, 2015, Illuminated History held its fourth annual cemetery tour in which fifteen actors portrayed eternal residents of three historic Perinton, New York, burying grounds: Egypt Cemetery, Schummers Cemetery and Perinton Center Cemetery.  The tour, which was sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society, took place at the Fairport Historical Museum.

In this Illuminated History series, the scripts are based on in depth historical research, although some creative license may have been taken.

The first person to be highlighted from this tour is Deva Ellsworth (1894-1925) of the Perinton Center Cemetery, who was portrayed by Denise McLaughlin:

Who here likes music? Any fans of jazz here? Well, I am Deva Ellsworth, and I was a professional musician during the heyday of jazz. Let me tell you my story.

I was born in May of 1894 on a farm on Ayrault Road. Our house was across from Center Cemetery. There is a school there now, which would have been convenient when I was growing up. Instead, my three siblings and I had to walk all the way down to the end of Ayrault, where it connects to the Palmyra Road, to District School #6. It was a long walk in winter, although we enjoyed it the rest of the year. After finishing eighth grade in the District School, I went to high school in East Rochester. I graduated in 1916, during World War I.

Deva Ellsworth, courtesy of the Perinton Town Historian

Deva Ellsworth, courtesy of the Perinton Town Historian

I was a talented musician, and rather unconventional for my day (thank you, Great-grandma Irena, for my independent spirit!). Instead of staying on the farm and finding a husband, I joined the Madame Meyers Ladies’ Band as the coronet soloist. (I played several brass instruments.) Now John Phillip Sousa was the most famous band-leader of that time, and concert bands were a popular form of entertainment all over the country, but neither Sousa’s band, nor any other professional band, would hire women, unless they were either a vocalist or a harp player! Consequently, women formed their own bands. We were well-received and never lacked for playing engagements, I assure you.

Madam Meyers’ band worked in Atlantic City the summer after I graduated. I found that I enjoyed performing and seeing life outside of Fairport. Subsequently, I toured New England and also out west with several bands. Soon after I graduated, however, the United States joined World War I. My brother Elmwood enlisted right away. My sister Ruby and I, not to be outdone in service to our country, both joined the America Ladies’ Military Band, which was led by the famous Helen May Butler, America’s “female Sousa.” There were about fifty women from all over the country in our band, and all of us had brothers in the service. We toured military training camps all over the U.S. to entertain our troops.

We played concerts at camps in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, and Missouri, to name just a few locations. However, 1918 brought unbelievable devastation: the Spanish Flu, which killed more U.S. serviceman than the fighting in Europe did. Our band often visited camps that were quarantined, and frequently we were playing only a few feet away from the bed of someone who was dying of the flu. One soldier’s last words were, “Please play that last selection again.” Not surprisingly, both Ruby and I caught the flu; her case was more severe than mine. We both survived, thank God. We had both hoped to go to Europe to entertain troops over there, but the war ended before we had the chance.

After the war, Ruby returned to Fairport and settled down. I, however, continued my life as a professional musician. I was in several exclusive women’s groups, including the Ladies’ Eleven Piece Jazz Orchestra. I traveled throughout New England, performing at famous, upscale resorts. I remained a performer all of my short life, working throughout the early 1920s, during the advent of Jazz and the start of Prohibition. It was an exciting time in history, especially for women.

Although I had survived the Spanish flu in 1918, I was never quite as healthy again. I became ill in late 1924, and,

Headstone of Deva Ellsworth, Perinton Center Cemetery

Headstone of Deva Ellsworth, Perinton Center Cemetery

after a lingering illness, died in April of 1925, just 8 days shy of my 30th birthday. I am buried in the family plot in Center Cemetery, across the road from where I grew up. In addition to looking eternally over the beautiful land that was our farm, I can often hear the strains of the Martha Brown band students as they rehearse; I just shake my head when they play Sousa! I am so proud that I got to spend my life working at something I loved, and I got to bring joy to so many people with my music. Who could ask for anything more out of life, however short that life might be?

Script by Suzanne Lee

(c) 2015 Vicki Profitt’s Illuminated History

Illuminating George C. Taylor and His Oil of Life

September 30, 2014

On June 17, 2014, Illuminated History held its third annual cemetery tour in which twelve actors portrayed residents of the burying ground.  The tour, which was sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society, took place at the Fairport Historical Museum due to inclement weather.  Greenvale Rural Cemetery in the village of Fairport, New York, was the focus of the tour.

In this Illuminated History series, each of the scripts of Greenvale’s featured eternal residents will be posted until all twelve have been illuminated.  Although the scripts are based on in depth historical research, some creative license may have been taken.

Our second Greenvale resident highlighted is George C. Taylor, as portrayed by Bob Hunt.

How’s everyone feeling today? Any coughs, colds, asthma? Stomach problems, kidney problems, liver problems? Cuts, bruises, burns? Chapped hands or lips? Earache? Toothache? Rheumatism? My Taylor’s Oil of Life [hold up bottle] can be used to cure almost any ill! Inside or out, my liniment is good for what ails you…and your horses and cows, too! Good for man or beast! Good for horn distemper, galls, caked bags, cracked teats, botts, and bellyache.

My father, Alonzo Taylor, began making Dr. Taylor’s Pain-annihilating Liniment in Cato, Cayuga County in 1848, when I was a school boy. I’m his son, George C. Taylor, and I worked in the family business from its very beginning. After my schooling was over, I helped run the company, and I took it over in 1861 when my father died. I moved the Taylor Company here to Fairport in 1866. The Civil War years had taken a toll on business, but things rebounded in the late 1860s.

George C. Taylor, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society

George C. Taylor, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society

In addition to manufacturing my father’s liniment, which I marketed under the name “Taylor’s Oil of Life,” I expanded my company’s offerings to include many fine and useful products, including flavored extracts, laudanum, perfume, blackberry cordial, cough syrup, breath sweeteners, bluing for laundry, and shaving soap. We made many other popular products over the years. My business was very successful, because I was always ahead of the trends and made quality household products people could use.

My decision to move my business to Fairport was a good one. Business became so good, in fact, that I built a new 3-story brick factory with offices on the corner of North Main Street and High Street in 1873. It was called the Taylor block for many years, and that building still stands today. The railroad had a spur that came right to my building, and I shipped my products all over the country. My wife Wealthy, my daughter Lois, and I lived upstairs. I employed many local residents in the manufacture of my wares.

In addition to my own business, my building housed several retail shops on Main Street, including a grocery store, a meat market, and a barber. I also let the Fairport Coronet Band use one of the upper rooms to practice each week. I believed in building up Fairport and helping other businesses thrive. A strong business community makes for a prosperous town, and everyone benefits from that.

I also believed that an informed community, one that is well-versed in the issues of the day, both locally and nationally, is the back-bone of a strong democracy. To that end, I founded Fairport’s first newspaper, The Fairport Herald, in 1871. Of course, the George C. Taylor Company was one of its prime advertisers. Papers need advertising to thrive, and businesses need to advertise! It was a win-win situation for Fairport and the Taylor Company. But I only operated the paper long enough to get it established, then sold it about two years later. It flourished, and the community was the better for having it. Every community should have its own paper!

During the 1870s, my ever-expanding sales strained my facility’s capacity for production, so I had to enlarge my building several times. I needed more commodious facilities to produce all the fine household products my customers had come to expect from the George C. Taylor Company. In 1887, the famous showman Buffalo Bill Cody took his Wild West Show to London for Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee. He sent me the following letter:

Gentlemen, for some time past I have used Taylor’s Oil of Life in our stables with marked success and during our recent ocean trip from New York City to London it was almost indispensible. Kindly forward me 18 large bottles immediately and I will remit upon receipt of invoice.
Yours truly,
W.F. Cody

It was an honor and a pleasure to aid someone so famous as Buffalo Bill. But my life was not only about my work, as rewarding as that was. My wife Wealthy and I were active in town, especially in the temperance movement. We did not drink or smoke, and believed in moderation in all things. I was universally acknowledged as a man of sterling character. Here is a portrait of me in my later years. My beautiful wife Wealthy departed this life in 1905. We had been married 40 years, and I was not used to being alone. So a few years later I remarried, to Miss Minnie Burchaskie of Fairport, in 1907.

Although I never belonged to any of the churches here in the village, I helped regularly with their various charitable causes, and helped

George C. Taylor's headstone at Greenvale Rural Cemetery, Fairport, New York

George C. Taylor’s headstone at Greenvale Rural Cemetery, Fairport, New York

promote the general welfare of the town. I used my hard-earned wealth to improve the lives of those in Fairport. In 1908, I was elected president of the village, which was both an honor and a responsibility. I wanted to make the town more conducive to business in general, and to manufacturing in particular. The role of government is to help businesses thrive, and that in turn allows a community’s residents to thrive. I was not able to implement all of my plans, though, as my term was cut short by my death in 1909.

The George C. Taylor Company continued to operate after my death, with products such as vanilla extract, aspirin, shaving cream, shampoo, facial creams, and toothpaste. By the time the company was closed in the 1950s, it had been a fixture in American households for over 100 years, and it all began with Taylor’s Oil of Life.

Script by Suzanne Lee

(c) 2014 Vicki Profitt’s Illuminated History


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