Posted tagged ‘Perinton Historical Society’

Illuminated History Tour of Three Historic Perinton Cemeteries on June 16, 2015

May 31, 2015

Three historic Perinton Cemeteries will be the focus of this year’s Illuminated History cemetery tour, which will take place on Tuesday, June 16 at 7:00 p.m. at the Fairport Historical Museum.

Hear the stories of some of Fairport’s most respected pioneers, business owners and Civil War soldiers as told by the actors portraying them. Throughout the evening, you’ll meet tavern owners Cyrus Packard and Oliver Loud, of Egypt Cemetery, as they debate the merits of their businesses. Civil War mother Delia Northrop Treadwell, an eternal resident of Schummers Cemetery, will remember her four sons who served in the Union Army. Early settlers James and Lucretia Packard Hannan, of Perinton Center Cemetery, will also illuminate their lives for attendees. These stories and more will be shared on this special tour sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society.

This program, which is free and open to the public, will take place at the Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin Street.

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Illuminating Charlotte Clapp, The First Perinton Town Historian

November 26, 2014

On June 17, 2014, Illuminated History held its third annual cemetery tour in which twelve actors portrayed residents of the burying ground.  The tour, which was sponsored by the Perinton Historical Society, took place at the Fairport Historical Museum due to inclement weather.  Greenvale Rural Cemetery in the village of Fairport, New York, was the focus of the tour.

In this Illuminated History series, each of the scripts of Greenvale’s featured eternal residents will be posted until all twelve have been illuminated.  Although the scripts are based on in depth historical research, some creative license may have been taken.

Our third Greenvale resident highlighted is Charlotte Clapp, as portrayed by Anne Johnston.

Charlotte Clapp, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

Charlotte Clapp, courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

Because of my dedicated service to Perinton, I became known as the “Town’s First Lady”. It is a title of which I am extremely proud. My name is Miss Charlotte Clapp. I suppose I should begin at the beginning, as they say. My father, Dr. Wesley Clapp, came to Fairport in the 1870s from Oswego County. He began to build up his medical practice and, by 1879, had met and married my mother, Roxa Jane Hodges. I was born in Fairport in 1884, the third of their five children.

Although I never married, my life was rewarding and very happy. My quest for knowledge led to many opportunities personally and professionally. In 1921, I became Perinton’s first Town Historian. Three years later, I was appointed Town Clerk for Perinton and served proudly as the first woman in that position. Thinking about it now, I seem to have led a life of firsts. Along with several others, I was a charter member of the Fairport Business and Professional Women’s Club in 1927. They even named me “Career Gal of the Month” in 1956! My passion, however, was for history. That passion was foremost in my mind when I, along with nine other women, founded the Perinton Historical Society in November, 1935. At the organizational meeting, I was named as the first Custodian of the Perinton Historical Society. My job was to record and preserve the artifacts and documents donated to the society, a position I undertook with zeal. I was also a member of the Fairport Historical Club.

Despite these professional successes, I did know my share of personal sadness. In 1911, my older brother, George, who was a coroner in Genesee County, died in a terrible automobile accident. George was on his way to the County Fair in Batavia and traveling at a great speed. Going around a curve, he lost control of his automobile and died almost instantly of multiple injuries. He was just 30 years of age. Our father was the first to hear the news. Father had traveled on the train hoping to surprise George. After stopping into a hotel he frequented with George, Father asked if George had come to dinner yet. The young fellow at the hotel was new and, not knowing to whom he was speaking, told Father, “No, and he never will. He has just been killed in an automobile accident”. That is how Father learned of George’s terrible accident. This was the first visitation of death in our family circle, and certainly not the last.

My oldest brother, Lewis, was the next to leave us, in 1914. We were so proud of our Lewis. He was a brilliant physician and a good man. Lewis died at age 33 following an operation for appendicitis, leaving a wife and two little daughters to mourn him. Father passed on in 1921, and my sister, Marion, died in 1933 at age 43. Marion loved to hike. When she didn’t return from a hiking expedition, a search was conducted. One week later, the body of my only sister was found at Hemlock Lake. The official cause of death was drowning. Those losses haunted my mother, who passed away in 1935. My youngest brother, Robert, died in 1980 at age 85. He and I were the only children in our family to live long lives.

It is rather ironic that I served the town so diligently as Town Historian, and yet my own home and its history

Clapp family home, formerly located at 15 Perrin Street in Fairport, New York.  Courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

Clapp family home, formerly located at 15 Perrin Street in Fairport, New York.

were taken when urban renewal reared its ugly head in 1972. Our home at 15 Perrin Street, of which my father was so proud, had been in the family for over 100 years. I have a photograph of it here.  My father started his medical practice there. I was born in the house in 1884, and my parents raised five children in the warmth of its embrace. Yet, the proud history of the Clapp family could not overcome progress. I would not have been able to bear the sight of my ancestral home being torn down to make way for a parking lot of the new Village Landing. The only saving grace was that I had passed away in 1964, just three weeks shy of my 80th birthday. Even though I am gone, the work I have done on behalf of the town and of the Perinton Historical Society remains. I am proud to have lived a life of firsts, paving the way for those women who followed in my footsteps.

Script by Vicki Masters Profitt

(c) 2014 Vicki Profitt’s Illuminated History

Resources:

Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum:  http://www.PerintonHistoricalSociety.org

“Decades of I Do: Wedding Gowns of the 20th Century” Exhibit Debuts at the Fairport Historical Museum

April 29, 2014

2013 was the year of Downton Abbey.  My previous post extolled the virtues of the show’s interesting characters and elegant costumes.  As Director of the Fairport Historical Museum, I had the opportunity create a “Fashions Inspired by Downton Abbey” exhibit featuring costumes that came directly from the collection of the Perinton Historical Society (PHS) and which represented the witty Dowager Countess, the demure Lady Sybil and the elegant Lady Grantham, among others.  Due to the tremendous response to that exhibit, I’ve entered the PHS closets once again to bring even more costumes to light.

The wedding gown of Alice Beaumont Warner.

The wedding gown of Alice Beaumont Warner.

In 2014, the Fairport Historical Museum celebrates weddings.  Our newest exhibit, “Decades of I Do: Wedding Gowns of the 20th Century” showcases twelve wedding gowns from area brides. Six dresses come from the PHS collection, while an additional six are on loan from their owners.  Wedding announcements and bridal photos accompany many of the gowns and serve to personalize each bride’s story.  Here is the story of our 1903 bride, Alice Beaumont, who has the distinction of having the earliest wedding gown in the exhibit.

Alice M. Beaumont, the daughter of Edward F. and Emma Sahlman Beaumont, was born in June, 1881.  She grew up on George Street in the village of Fairport, New York, and it was in the parlor of that home that Alice and George H. Warner were married on October 1, 1903 beneath a beautiful arch of evergreen and floral decorations as eighty friends and family members looked on.  Dressed in white lansdown trimmed with Irish lace, the bride carried a bouquet of white roses to meet her groom.

Alice Beaumont and George H. Warner on their wedding day, October 1, 1903.  Photo courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

Alice Beaumont and George H. Warner on their wedding day, October 1, 1903. Photo courtesy of the Perinton Historical Society.

George H. Warner was the son of George S. and Lena Peglow Warner.  George S. had served during the Civil War  in the 16th U. S. Infantry.  George S. and Lena had seven children, of which George H. was number four.

The Beaumonts also had a Civil War veteran in their midst.  Alice’s paternal grandfather, Thomas Beaumont, served in Co. A, 8th New York Cavalry.

Alice and George became parents in 1908 upon the birth of their first son, Leon.  Three more sons, Hollis, Vincent and George Maxwell, would follow within the next seven years.  George supported his growing family by working as a foreman at the American Can Company.

1915 was a dreadful year for Alice Beaumont Warner.  On May 19th her mother, Emma Sahlman Beaumont, died.  Three months later, a motorcycle accident ended the life of her grandfather, Frederick Sahlman.  Then in October Alice’s aunt, Elizabeth Sahlman Bort, was killed in an automobile accident.  In the midst of this sadness, Alice gave birth to her fourth and final son, George Maxwell Warner.  Little George must have been the only bright spot in this annus horribilus.

The Warners lived at 25 Woodlawn Avenue in Fairport for the majority of their 66 year marriage, which ended only with George’s death on March 25, 1970.  Alice Beaumont Warner died twelve days later.  They were buried at White Haven Cemetery in Pittsford, New York.

Alice is just one of the brides represented in this exhibit.  I invite you to visit the Fairport Historical Museum, located at 18 Perrin Street near the Village Landing, during regular open hours (Sundays and Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 p.m., Thursdays 7:00-9:00 p.m. and Saturdays 9:00-11:00 a.m.) to view these exquisite wedding gowns and to read the announcements of nuptials from the past, when “O Promise Me” was a popular wedding song and the Green Lantern Inn was the fashionable place to hold a wedding reception.

Inspired by Downton Abbey

December 3, 2013

Over the past two weeks, it seems as if I’ve been living and breathing Downton Abbey.  Not that I’m complaining.  Since the first season of Downton, I’ve been mesmerized by the characters and the intrigues but also, more importantly, by the elegant costumes and history of the time period.

Bruce, Alastair003Last week, I had the opportunity to attend a special luncheon presented by WXXI featuring Alastair Bruce, OBE, historical advisor to Downton Abbey.  It was an intimate gathering – just me, my friend Suzanne Lee, and 400 other fans of the show.  What a time we had!  This was Mr. Bruce’s only presentation in the United States and, I’m very proud to say, it was held in Rochester, New York.  Captivating the audience with charm and wit,  Mr. Bruce regaled us with stories about the making of the show.  Who knew that Rob James-Collier, also known as the dastardly servant Thomas Barrows, is an amazingly nice guy in real life?  Or that the actors sometimes get tired of being told to tilt their heads differently or to sit up straighter?  If I came away with anything from the presentation, it was to watch for the little details going on in the background of the show.  Did you ever notice the servants measuring how far each chair was from the table?  Those are the details that go into creating a show of such high caliber.

This week, I have the pleasure of being a guest speaker at the Barnes & Noble in Webster, New York, for their Downton Abbey event, where I will display and discuss seven Downton Abbey inspired costumes from the collection of the Perinton Historical Society (PHS) which were recently exhibited at the Fairport Museum.  The PHS has an impressive collection of over 1,000 costumes and accessories from the mid-1800s through modern times.  My original plans were to create a different costume exhibit for the museum.  However, once I saw the black gown, an inner voice that sounded much like the Dowager Countess said, “My dear, you must display Downton Abbey.  Nothing else will do!”  B&N Flyer 2013002After that, the costumes nearly jumped out of the closet.  There was an exquisite gown which would have been stunning on Lady Grantham.  Sweet Sybil was represented in white and blue, while Edith’s no nonsense attitude manifested itself in a black sheath dress.  Lady Mary wore a classic long, black gown complete a net jacket embellished with thousands of small beads.  Even Mrs. Hughes and Lady Rose MacClare were represented in the exhibit.

Although the Downton Abbey exhibit at the Fairport Museum has ended, you still have the opportunity to see the fabulous costumes at this one time event at Barnes & Noble, located at 1070 Ridge Road in Webster, New York.  It promises to be a fun evening.  Our friends from the Rochester Historical Society, whose own Downton Abbey exhibit opens today, will also be there.  So will Kristen Zory King of Writers & Books, who will give a short presentation about why the female characters of Downton Abbey draw us in.  Stop by on Thursday evening, December 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. to gaze at these exquisite pieces of history that were once worn by women from our own community.

Illuminated History Tour of South Perinton Cemetery and Mary Jewett Telford Dedication Ceremony

June 19, 2012
 
Our Illuminated History South Perinton Cemetery Tour and Mary Jewett Telford Dedication Ceremony is this evening, June 19, 2012.  Please join us at 7:00 p.m. at South Perinton Cemetery, 291 Wilkinson Road, Fairport, New York, as actors bring the lives of eleven cemetery residents to life.  The tour ends at the grave of Civil War nurse Mary Jewett Telford, where a ceremony will be held to dedicate her Woman’s Relief Corps flag holder.  We hope to see you there!
 
This tour is sponsored by Illuminated History and the Perinton Historical Society.

President Ulysses S. Grant to Visit Fairport, NY on March 15, 2011

March 13, 2011

Please join the Perinton Historical Society on Tuesday, March 15, 2011, for a once in a lifetime opportunity as we proudly welcome President Ulysses S. Grant to Fairport. President Grant, as portrayed by Steve Trimm of Grant Cottage in Wilton, New York, will speak of his time as General during the Civil War. He will also discuss the eight years he served as the 18th President of the United States. The President will take questions following his speech.

Steve Trimm has been involved with Grant Cottage for the last four years, as a tour guide and through educational outreach programs. He recently had an article about Grant Cottage caretaker and Civil War veteran Oliver P. Clarke published in New York Archives magazine. Besides portraying President Grant, Oliver P. Clarke and several other notable historical figures, Mr. Trimm has broadcast a Listener Essay on WAMC and was involved with the making of a CD entitled, “Grant and Lincoln: A Conversation”.  Information about Grant Cottage can be found at http://www.grantcottage.org.

This event is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Fairport Museum, located at 18 Perrin Street in Fairport, New York, at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 15, 2011.

Looking Back While Facing Forward

January 1, 2011

The end of the year brings reflection as we put to rest one year while looking ahead to a new beginning.  I’ll always remember 2010 as an incredible year for my Civil War soldiers project, as well as for the start of some new research projects. 

Martha Jewett & Evan Marshall visit Mary Jewett Telford's grave

In January, I met a descendant of one of my Civil War veterans.  Martha Jewett is the second great-grandniece of Civil War nurse Mary Jewett Telford.  Martha and her husband, Evan Marshall, drove to Fairport to attend my Illuminated History presentation for the Perinton Historical Society.  After Martha and Evan returned home, we spent a frantic two weeks emailing and calling each other in order to meet the deadline for Mary Jewett Telford’s nomination to the National Women’s Hall of Fame.  We will soon hear whether we were successful in our endeavor.

With February came a slight shift in my research, as I began to study the World War I soldiers of Pittsford.  February was also memorable as it was the first time I have formally interviewed a research subject.  Bill Cooper, a World War II veteran and survivor of the Battle of the Bulge, was my assignment.  Bill is a member of American Legion Rayson-Miller Post 899.  The stories he shared about his military experience and life with his wife, Margaret, were 

Bill Cooper, World War II vet

 inspiring.  I also had the opportunity to meet with Philip G. Maples for the first time.  Phil is the Director Emeritus of the Rochester Medical Museum & Archives.  Since then, I have volunteered research time to the RMMA, as well as spent time with Phil, who is himself a Civil War researcher and enthusiast.  I proudly headed to school in February to hear my daughter make her first presentation by portraying Civil War nurse Mary Jewett Telford.

March rang in another opportunity to interview a Battle of the Bulge veteran.  This time it was Ed Kinnen, also a   member of Rayson-Miller.  Ed and his wife, Ellen, graciously invited me into their home so I could talk with Ed about his World War II service.  We share a common love of genealogy, and I was happy to hear them speak of their children and grandchildren and the importance of sharing the family history with them. 

Lynda Skaddan & Jane Andersen, Telford descendants

The next few months went by in a blur as I once again collaborated with Pittsford Town Historian Audrey Johnson for our annual Pittsford Cemetery tour in May.  Theo X. Rojo, who researches the men of the 13th NY Infantry and the 22nd NY Cavalry, contacted me in May and we have spent much time emailing back and forth regarding those units and others.  June was the pinnacle of excitement.  I gave a tour at Greenvale Cemetery for the Perinton Historical Society members.  I was so pleased to meet Cheri Branca, one of my online friends and fellow Find A Grave contributor, who attended the Greenvale tour with her husband, Matt.  Jane Andersen and Lynda Skaddan, descendants of Robert Telford, made a special trip to Fairport with Lynda’s husband Ray so I could meet them at Mary Jewett Telford’s grave to discuss her life.  Mary was wed to Robert’s younger brother, Jacob Telford.  In June, I also had the opportunity to meet Norman and John Henry Miller, who are the nephews of Henry L. Miller.  Henry was killed at Belleau Wood during World War I.  Norm and John are not only veterans themselves, but they come from a long line of men who served their country, beginning with their great-grandfather, Civil War veteran Henry L. Mueller.

Throughout the rest of 2010, I gave a presentation for the American Legion Rayson-Miller Post 899 and discussed the 

John and Norm Miller at the grave of their uncle, Henry L. Miller

early history of the post and its members.  Audrey Johnson and I hosted another tour of the Pioneer Burying Ground in October, and I started a Facebook page for Illuminated History.  However, I think the biggest thrill has been meeting the veterans’ descendants and other researchers, both in person, by phone and online.  I spoke by phone with John R. Bacon, grandson of WWI & WWII Lieutenant Colonel Howard Bacon and great-grandson of Civil War vet John Buckley Bacon, after emailing back and forth for several years.  I spoke with veteran David Retchless about his military service, as well as those of his brother, father and uncle.  Tyler Emery, the current owner of the Retchless military memorabilia, and I have corresponded via email and he has graciously shared photos of the contents of the trunk he owns.  At the Pioneer Burying Ground tour, I met Gail and Marilyn, the daughters of World War I vet Raymond L. Hulbert.  I’ve also had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Lloyd F. Allen’s daughters, Betty Anne and Katie, as well as his granddaughter, Elizabeth.  Dr. Allen, like his friend and neighbor Howard Bacon, had also served in both World Wars.

2010 was an extraordinary year.  Thank you for your interest in my project, and your appreciation for these veterans.  With your support, Illuminated History will continue to shine the light on these heroes for many years to come.


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