Posted tagged ‘Charles E. Moore’

Greenvale Cemetery Tour – June 8, 2010

June 8, 2010

Nathan C. Jeffrey, 54th Massachusetts Infantry

What a beautiful evening for a walking tour of Greenvale Cemetery in Fairport, New York!  Thank you to everyone who came out to enjoy the perfect weather while hearing the incredible stories of the Civil War soldiers who permanently reside there.

We began our tour with Samuel Larwood of the 33rd New York Infantry before moving over to meet Nathan C. Jeffrey, the young soldier who served under Colonel Robert Gould Shaw in the famed 54th Massachusetts Infantry.  Chester Hutchinson of the 108th New York Infantry amazed everyone with his own description of the wound he received at the Battle of the Wilderness.  The sad story of Charles E. Moore, musician in the 108th New York, followed.  He was just 17 years old when he died of disease.  Charles will not be forgotten.

The “white bronze” Hitchcock monument was next.  It has truly stood the test of time.  The 6th Michigan Cavalry was represented at Greenvale by Doctor Daniel G. Weare, who “looked like a preacher though he could swear like a pirate.”  John D. Kohler of the 140th New York Infantry preceded Joseph S. Kelsey.  Joseph assisted his sister and brother-in-law, Josephine Martha Clarke and Oliver P. Clarke, as caretakers for Mount McGregor, the cottage where President Ulysses S. Grant spent his last months and ultimately died.

Frederick Prouse and the strong military influence in his family were discussed next.  Two of Frederick’s grandsons, Lyle Prouse and Dean Shaw, both served during WWI.  A great-grandson, another Lyle Prouse, was a radio operator on a B-29 bomber during WWII and died when his plane crashed on Iwo Jima.  We then discussed Andrew Abrams, who lost his leg at the Battle of Petersburg, and his brother-in-law George C. Taylor who established the Fairport Herald in 1872.

Everyone was so patient as we overran our time to discuss George S. Filkins, Alanson W. Pepper, William H. Jerrells and Simeon Pepper Howard before ending with Shadrick Benson of the 3rd New York Cavalry.  Special thanks to Alan Keukelaar, Vice-President of the Perinton Historical Society, for setting up the tour, and to Laurie T. Hall and Katie Profitt for their assistance.

Drummer Boy Charles E. Moore of the 108th New York Infantry

September 10, 2009

Just a quick update on the status of Charles E. Moore’s fallen headstone.  The Town of Perinton forwarded my email regarding the possible headstone vandalism to the Village of Fairport.  As of this morning, I had not heard anything from them.  A drive by Greenvale Cemetery today showed that Charles’ headstone is still down.

Cemetery Vandalism – The Desecration of More Than Just a Headstone

August 21, 2009
Charles E. Moore, photo taken on August 20, 2009

Charles E. Moore, photo taken on August 20, 2009

Yesterday, I made my second visit to Greenvale Cemetery located in the village of Fairport, New York.  My previous visit had been on the third of June when I began my research into the Civil War soldiers of Perinton and Fairport.  As I wandered the well-manicured lawn, I noticed a headstone that had toppled over.  A closer look showed that the headstone belonged to Charles E. Moore, a Civil War soldier who had died in service.  Charles joined the 108th NY Volunteer Infantry as a drummer boy.  Less than one year later, Charles was dead of disease at the tender age of 16.

While I don’t know how Charles’ headstone ended up looking skyward, I can imagine the cause may have been vandalism, as there were 6-8 other headstones in the same vicinity which were lying on the ground.  The photo I took on my first visit to Greenvale confirmed that the headstone belonging to this young drummer boy had been upright just a few months before.

I’m not usually one to discuss my views and beliefs in public, but I must say that cemetery vandalism ranks near the top of my list of abhorrent behavior.  What difference does it make to the people of today if someone vandalizes a headstone belonging to a boy of yesterday, long dead and seemingly unremembered, when there is so much strife in today’s world?

The fact is that cemetery vandalism is the desecration of more than just a headstone.  Headstones serve as symbols of our loved ones.  They help us remember our dead.  Who has the right to determine that this boy doesn’t deserve to be remembered?  By knocking over his headstone, this vandal has tried to desecrate the identity which belongs solely to Charles E. Moore.  His headstone is the only way we have to remember him now. 

I’ve contacted the Village of Fairport to alert them of the issue in the hopes that they will be able to right the fallen headstones.  Luckily, the headstone belonging to Charles lies unbroken in the grass, and can once again be placed back on its proper pedestal.  I’ll update the status on the possible vandalism at Greenvale Cemetery as soon as I have more information.

Because Charles was a soldier, his death is all the more poignant to me.  He left his home to serve his country.  He died of illness before being allowed to experience life.  He mourned his fallen comrades in arms even as he himself was mourned just a short time later.  Charles earned his identity and, by his service, earned his military headstone.  Charles E. Moore deserves to be remembered, and I will ensure that he is.


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